Tag Archives: Jesus Christ

The feast of the Annunciation

 

When the Angel Gabriel appeared to Mary in the Annunciation, he invited her to welcome the Son of God into her womb and into the world. She said yes and our redemption was at hand. In this meditation we ponder this great event as related by St Luke and consider that:

  • Because of the original sin of our first parents, mankind was in need of redemption and only God could bring it about.
  • God asked Mary ‘s consent so that our Redeemer could take flesh in her womb
  • Because Mary was a virgin her son would be truly the Son of God
  • As the Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches, God took flesh in Mary for four reasons
  • As related in a homily of St Bernard of Clairvaux, all mankind eagerly awaited Mary’s answer
  • We too can welcome Christ into our life by saying yes to whatever God asks of us

The meaning of Christmas

 

Everyone loves Christmas, when we celebrate the birth of Christ in Bethlehem. In this meditation we use the Catechism of the Catholic Church and texts of St Josemaria to pray about why God became man and the consequences this has for us. According to the Catechism, God became man for four reasons:

  • to save us by reconciling us with God
  • so that we might know God’s love
  • to be our model of holiness
  • to make us partakers of the divine nature

Lessons from the Cross

Jesus’ passion and death give us many lessons.  In this meditation we use texts from St Thomas Aquinas and St Josemaria Escriva to consider some of the many virtues Christ teaches us from the Cross:

  • Charity and patience
  • Humility and obedience
  • Detachment and fortitude
  • Joy

 

 

Rich in mercy

The parable of the prodigal son is mercy perosnified.

     

    The Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments abound in references to God as “ever rich in mercy.” It is good to remember this, especially when we are discouraged by our sinfulness or tempted to despair of our eternal salvation. In this meditation we consider:

    • Our Lord’s incarnation and his suffering and death for our redemption
    • His will “that all be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth”
    • His forgiving of the sins of many
    • His teaching on the mercy of God
    • Pope Francis’ reminder that God will always forgive us and his exhortation to ask God for forgiveness
    • Our Lord’s sorrow at the death of Judas

    Christ our Hope

    Jesus Christ is our hope.

    In the ups and downs of life there are many events which are not in our control, where we can only put our hope in God. In this meditation we use texts of Scripture and Pope Benedict XVI’s encyclical Saved by hope to put our life on a sure foundation. We consider that:

    • The foundation of our hope is God, who is always with us.
    • Our hope in God enables us to find peace and joy even amidst the uncertainties and sufferings of life.
    • The ultimate object of our hope is eternal life with God in heaven.
    • We can grow in hope through prayer in its various forms.
    • Mary, our Mother, is our hope: she brings us hope in the person of Jesus, she lives hope herself in many moments, and she intercedes powerfully for us in heaven.

    The road to Emmaus

    The Road to Emmaus is one of the more renowned stories of Jesus's appearing to his disciples after His resurrection.

    Jesus walked with two disciples on the Road to Emmaus. The latter did not recognise him until later when he sat with them and broke bread.

     

    On the first Easter Sunday, two disciples left Jerusalem discouraged because the one they hoped would redeem Israel had died. On their way to Emmaus, Jesus walked beside them and explained the Scriptures to them. These two in some way represent all of us. We too have our times of trial, of worry, of discouragement, and Jesus seeks us out, even though we do not recognise him. In this meditation we consider how:

     

    • We all have our crosses, our difficulties in life, which can make us discouraged or worried
    • Jesus does not leave us alone but seeks us out and walks beside us
    • We find Jesus in our prayer and in others who are there to help us
    • We too can be there for others who are going through difficult times

    Holy Week close to Christ

    Holy week starts with Palm Sunday.

      Jesus enters Jerusalem and is well received, a feast we celebrate on Palm Sunday–the start of Holy Week.

     

    In Holy Week we follow Christ from his triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, through his institution of the Eucharist and the priesthood on Holy Thursday, to his passion and death on Good Friday and his resurrection on Easter Sunday. If we follow him closely throughout our life we will not abandon him as did the apostles and we will rise to eternal life with him when we die. In this meditation we consider how we should:

    • acknowledge our weakness and our possibility of denying Our Lord as did Peter
    • attend Mass often and receive Holy Communion well in order to strengthen our love for Jesus
    • stay awake in our prayer in order to draw ever closer to Christ
    • follow Christ closely, not at a distance, avoiding lukewarmness
    • avoid attachment to creature comforts and things in order to have our heart free to love God
    • take up our cross daily and follow our Lord in his passion
    • follow Christ closely throughout our life in order to rise with him to eternal life